Apple’s Native Apps Trojan Horse

Apple announced SwiftUI at WWDC 2019 and like a lot of people, I mostly ignored it because I knew that it would need some time to mature before it would be ready to use in production software. I also wasn’t sure if it would “stick” in terms of long term, viability. However, after another year of development, it’s clear that Apple has made a commitment to it. The newly announced Widgets and App Clips as well as enhancements to WatchOS definitely push developers hard towards SwiftUI.

SwiftUI appears to be Apple’s answer to the React programming movement, and given the similarity of SwiftUI to React, I expect a lot of the response will be positive. However, I believe this to be a bit of a Trojan Horse in relation to cross-platform development. As I mentioned earlier, apps that want to use some of the newer technologies, like Widgets, have no choice but to use SwiftUI. For an app that’s written natively in Swift, this will be easy. Apps written in cross-platform environments will have to work a lot harder.

Eventually, Widgets and App Clips will become expected functionality for many apps, and while most cross-platform solutions already support mixing native code with non-native code, the level of complexity of supporting these will essentially require developers to be fluent in multiple languages and multiple development environments. I’m very curious to see how these cross-platform development communities respond and adapt to this change because over time this will erode one of their key advantages.

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